Un-like-believable: “Like” is now an infix

Stan Carey at Sentence First reports on the many new usages of the word like, such as quotative (in the comments, some people note that this is often used for inexact quotation). However, the most surprising is its use in Australia as an infix — a very rare beast in English: “‘Like’ is an infix now, which is un-like-believably innovative”.

I am yet to come across this usage myself, but I’ll be looking out for it.

I’ll not be adopting it either. Not deliberately, anyway, but one never knows. So much of language is unconscious. Gone are the days when I consciously adjusted my speech patterns. I did, in times of yore, deliberately change my pronunciation of schedule from /ˈskɛ.djuːl/ to /ˈʃɛd.juːl/ because I read somewhere that the latter pronunciation is less American. I care far less about this sort of thing nowadays, but having done the work of changing the way I say the word I feel no need to change it back.

The Best Countries

Newsweek has a summary of the best countries in the world, measured by a number of different criteria, such as quality of life, political freedom, and economic vitality. It’s pretty interesting.

TRiG.

Expelled!

In New South Wales, a proposed law would allow private schools to expel gay students.

The law exempts private schools from any obligation to enrol or deal fairly with students who are homosexual. An expulsion requires neither disruption, harassment nor even the flaunting of sexuality. Being homosexual is enough.

The churches and church-run schools are themselves divided on whether they want the law.

“I think that you explain: this is a Christian school, that unless the child is prepared to accept that it is chaste, that it is searching for alternatives as well, that the school may decide that it might be better for the child as well that he goes somewhere else. I think it’s a loving response.”

Christians really are fond of the word love, aren’t they?

TRiG.