Film: Calvin & Hobbes

Bill Watterson has said that there will absolutely definitively not be a Calvin & Hobbes film. That’s probably a good thing. I can’t imagine that any such film could be anything less than a travesty. However, there is going to be a film about Calvin & Hobbes and Bill Watterson. It’s called Dear Mr Watterson, and looks like it might be interesting and rather pleasing.

TRiG.

Vi Hart, Spongebob, Fibonacci numbers, lack of bilateral symmetry in pineapples, and climbing snails

Yes.

Vi Hart announced that pineapples have Fibbonacci spirals, not bilateral symmetry, and therefore the pineapple house in Spongebob Squarepants is inaccurate.

And so the series designer, Kenny P., decided to redesign the set. Cool, huh?

Meanwhile, the snail which had appeared as a supporting character in Vi Hart’s Spongebob videos went on to a staring role:

And it only gets more epic from there:

(Even CGP Grey says it’s epic, in the comments.)

Meanwhile, back on the subject of Fibbonacci numbers (and Lucas numbers):

Simple rules: complex consequences. It’s wonderful.

TRiG.

Cartoon Drawings and the Default Human Being; or, Why do Japanese people draw themselves as white?

Had this question ever occurred to you? I don’t read much manga myself (barely any, though I do like the art style), but it does, at first glance, seem that everyone in them is white.

As it turns out, that is an American opinion, not a Japanese one. The Japanese see anime characters as being Japanese. It is Americans who think they are white. Why?  Because to them white is the Default Human Being.

Another way to look at this is to say that we’re not aware of our own stereotypes (or, at least, so long as we’re in the majority culture, we have no need to be aware of our own stereotypes).

Besides, that is not how the Japanese draw white or even Chinese people. The otherness of foreigners is clearly marked by physical stereotypes – just as Americans do with people of colour. In anime White Americans are stereotyped as having yellow hair, blue eyes and a long or big nose.

Right.

And, of course, some of the main art styles of manga were taken from American comics in the first place.

TRiG.