Un-like-believable: “Like” is now an infix

Stan Carey at Sentence First reports on the many new usages of the word like, such as quotative (in the comments, some people note that this is often used for inexact quotation). However, the most surprising is its use in Australia as an infix — a very rare beast in English: “‘Like’ is an infix now, which is un-like-believably innovative”.

I am yet to come across this usage myself, but I’ll be looking out for it.

I’ll not be adopting it either. Not deliberately, anyway, but one never knows. So much of language is unconscious. Gone are the days when I consciously adjusted my speech patterns. I did, in times of yore, deliberately change my pronunciation of schedule from /ˈskɛ.djuːl/ to /ˈʃɛd.juːl/ because I read somewhere that the latter pronunciation is less American. I care far less about this sort of thing nowadays, but having done the work of changing the way I say the word I feel no need to change it back.

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